9 Questions to Swedish Poltical Parties

The debates are ongoing in Sweden and to get a better understanding of the situation I asked the same standard questions to all major Swedish political parties by approaching their wooden huts in Uppsala’s Stora Torget. This is one of the many sites across the country in which representatives of the different poltical parties hand out flyers, talk to citizens and answer questions.

 

I asked some questions in English for the benefit of those who are not fluent enough in Swedish to engage in the political debate that surrounds them and for those who are interested in the topic from overseas.

 

Here are the list of Questions asked:


  1.  What are the core values your party represents?
  2. Where would you place your party in the Left-Right political spectrum?
  3.  Which are the parties you feel closest to in the European Parliament?
  4. Why should people vote for your party?
  5. What are the general priorities your party aims at achieving throughout Sweden?
  6. Why should people vote for your party on a Local level?
  7. If elected, what will you do for Uppsala? And for Uppland?
  8. Do you have any links to further material on your party in English?
  9. Any other closing comments or remarks?

 


 

Find the answers given by the Uppsala-based political representatives of the different parties.

These are the ones which have answered so far:

 

These are the ones which we are still waiting on answers from:

  • Sveriges Demokraterna
  • Vänsterpartiet

Must have apps for an Uppsala Student

Uppsala student specific

Nationsguiden (or nationsguiden.se) is an app to get all the information about everything that is going on in the Uppsala student nation scene, from cafes to pubs to clubs and gasques. Sometimes the app doesn´ t work properly (at least on my phone) so alternatively you can always access all this information from an internet browser by following the link.

Mecenat App: Mecenat is the company that issues all Swedish university students with a student card and in Uppsala also with a nation card. The app allows you to find discounts for students that you are entitled to, but most importantly allows you to have a valid digital nation card that you can show the person at the door together with your normal ID. Unfortunately the app is only available in Swedish but for the purpose of setting it up and finding the student card it´ s fairly easy. To set it up you need the code which is in the letter, sent  with your card. If you have lost it, try contacting them either via the form on their website  or by chatting to them via social Facebook.

UL (Upplands lokaltrafik) is the app in which you can find all the information about public transport timetables and bus routes in Uppsala and the surrounding areas. You can also connect a debit or credit card to the account and buy tickets from the app (providing you have an internet connection).The price is 22 kronor for local bus journeys as opposed to 35 kronor if you pay by card on the bus.

 

Transport for all over Sweden 

SJ the app of Swedish National rail which gives you the timetables of all trains in Sweden often including buses to integrate your journey. Create yourself a profile on the SJ website and start earning points each time you travel. Also you can have your details saved and buy train tickets directly from there!  

Taxi Kurir is a taxi firm which has taxis in all major Swedish cities. You can download the app and get quotes for journeys and if you create a profile and connect it to a debit or credit card, you can also pay for your ride directly via the app which saves you money compared to paying in the car. Also available in English!

 

For practicing your Swedish language skills

Both these apps can be used on a internet browser from a PC or tablet .You create a profile with a username and password and can login from more than one device to the app and use it. The best part is that they are free of charge, easy to use and fairly fun.

Duolingo. Probably the most famous language learning app worldwide offers you a fun and easy way to learn new words in Swedish.   

Memrise: even better than Duolingo, in my point of view, Memrise allows you to learn useful sentences in Swedish which is more advanced than Duolingo and more useful on a day to day basis.   

Google translate: really useful as you can copy and paste long texts into it and it will translate in a matter of seconds from Swedish into English (or any other language really).

Saving money

A really good website which has also a free app available for download is Pricerunner. It is available for several countries but it is useful for comparing prices for a certain product in many shops both on the highstreet and online.

ResQ Club is an app that aims to reduce food spoilage at restaurants and cafés. When you download the app you are able to see which food establishments in your vicinity that have leftover food they are planning to throw away, that you can buy for half of the original price! A great way to save both the planet and your lean student piggy bank.

Stalking

Sweden is a stalker’s paradise as the laws that regulate the right to public information are much stronger than the privacy protection laws. If you know someone’s name and surname you can find out the address where they live, who they live with, their date of birth, their mainline and mobile number and even how much they earn! There are several websites and apps that allow you to gain this information for free. Among the most popular ones are hitta.se and eniro.se so if you have a telephone number you can find out who it belongs to and viceversa.

Original article published in ‘Ergo’, Uppsala’s student magazine, on 17th of February 2017.

Guide to Student Life in Uppsala

Uppsala is one of the best cities to be a student in Scandinavia and possibly in the entire world. With a really old university, founded in 1477, it has centuries of traditions and is centred around academia and student life. It is the fourth largest city in Sweden (after Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö) and has a population of around 150 000 (in 2015) of which more than 45 000 are students.

If you are reading this article, chances are you may be one of those 45 000 students, perhaps even one of the new ones, in which case the next part could be of use to you as I will try and give you tips that could come in handy:

Buy a bike! Might sound silly in the midst of winter. Right now, many rely on buses and just walking as the roads may be too icy or it may be simply too cold to ride a bicycle, but when spring comes everyone will have one and you do not want to be ‘one of those people’ who forces everyone to walk or who has to ride solo on a bus. There are many ways you can buy bikes second hand either via Facebook groups or dedicated shops.

Lock your bike, always! Not only lock it but make sure it is secured to something like a lamppost or a bicycle rack. Apart from people stealing bikes (which apparently is one of the most common crimes committed in Uppsala), many drunken students have the nasty habit of throwing bikes into the river so beware! A really big hotspot for this is in front of Norrlands nation.

Use your bike ‘the Swedish way’: make sure you have a working bell, a front and a back light (also led ones will do) and use the designated cycle lanes. If you do not follow these rules you could get fined 500 kronor each for every transgression on the spot! Also remember not to walk in cycle lanes, may sound stupid but you would be surprised about how many people tend to do this and get angry reactions from the cyclists.

Become a member of a Student Nation! There are 13 different ones and each one represents a different area in Sweden. You can join any nation you like (unless you are Swedish in which case if you do not have family ties to Södermaland or Nerikes regions, you cannot join Snerikes. But for all the other ones no problem). Joining one nation gives you access to all 13 of them, even when they sell alcohol (so during pub and club nights). Each one gives different perks specific to that nation. Most give free entry to their club for members (except Kalmar and Upplands who only give 50 percent off) while others also give you discount on food and hot drinks at their pubs and cafes. Most also give their members priority for buying gasque tickets with them. You can join as many nations as you like; I’m currently a member of 2 but debating if I should to join a third one too! The membership fee is paid once a semester. If you want to join you need to speak to the 1Q of that particular nation and bring ID and proof of studies (Swedish personal number or T-number should be enough).

Get involved in the Nations! If you just go to the nations for fika, the odd pub and weekly club I feel you may be missing out on a big part of  ‘Uppsala student life’. Working in the nations is super easy; you meet new people, get the chance to practice your Swedish, learn new skills, eat good food and so on. The best thing is that for most nation jobs no previous experience is required so you can try out making hamburgers in a busy pub kitchen, pouring beers and mixing drinks at a bar or even just checking ID and student cards (ideal if you want to read a book, study or watch a film). Most nations do not pay for the work you do (even if they do it’s peanuts as 35 kronor per hour is nothing compared to what a normal waiter gets which is a minimum of 90 kronor) as it is part of the spirit ‘students 4 students’ in which, by working for free, we allow people to have a really cheap meal. You do however still get rewarded for your work and the sort of reward varies from nation to nation. It could be anything from a card to skip the line and get free entry to the weekly club for one month, (like in Stockholms Nation) to a free staff dinner followed by an afterparty in Östgöta Nation (both of which you get if you work three shifts). Mainly one does it for the social life and to meet Swedish people who, for an international student, are not always the easiest people to socialise with in normal situations, at least in my experience.

Download these must have apps! There are some essential free apps that one can dowload to make life easier both in Uppsala and in the whole of Sweden.

Join one of the Student Unions. They fight for our rights and are there to support us if we have any sort of problems within our department or in our student life in general. They also offer a lot of services (from sexual health advice to a student wellbeing centre) and when you join Uppsala student union they give you a free tote bag and you get a ten percent discount off books and merchandise in Studentbokhandeln. To join just head over to their headquarters during office hours and while there help yourself to information leaflets on the city of Uppsala and student life in general, pick up some free goodies such as notebooks or condoms. Though Uppsala student union is the biggest and oldest student union in Uppsala, there are several other student unions you can join as well, depending on your field of study. You can find all of them listed here.

Flash your student card in shops and restaurants! Many of them offer student discounts, and even if they don’t – it never hurts to ask. You can find a list of all the discounts offered to you at mecenat.com (unfortunately the page doesn’t have any English translation, so you might have to ask your kind Swedish-speaking neighbour or Google translate to help you understand it).

Make the most of Student Deals on mobile phone rates! When I first arrived in Uppsala I got given the free sim card in the university welcome pack but after almost a year living here I realised that paying 49 Kr for 0.5 GB was extortionate even for ‘expensive Sweden’. After some research I found Vimla! which is a start-up based in Södermalm that instead of investing heavily on marketing campaigns rely on the mouth to mouth system. So if I refer someone I get 10 Kr off my monthly fee and so do those that I referred. The monthly fee is  90 Kr which gives you: 2 GB (3 GB if you are a student or over 55) | 60 min. for nationwide mobiles and landlines | 600 SMS | 20 GB extra data. Unused data, minutes and texts role onto the next month if you have not used them all! Plus the first 3 months you pay 40 Kr instead of 90 Kr and there is no binding time! To sign up and get 10 Kr off each month (paying 40 and eventually 90 Kr as opposed to 50 and 100 Kr) follow my referral link: https://vimla.se/?201705101301370838 Only problem is the website and the free app are only available in Swedish but if you use the translate function on Chrome you should be fine and if you are not just ask them for help via chat, they all speak English and are all very friendly and helpful.

Going home for a few days? Use the coach (yellow bus number 801) to go to Arlanda airport. It might take longer than the train (40 minutes as opposed to 20) but tickets are also half the price of trains. You can also buy tickets for the bus on the UL app mentioned previously if you want to save a few extra kronor. It operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Go to Uppsalingo! If you want to practice your Swedish and are willing to teach your mother tongue language in exchange this is the place for you! There are regular meetings held in a nation pub where people are divided according to their mother-tongue language and sit at tables.The first hour is dedicated to Swedes teaching Swedish and in the second hour you swap and you teach the Swedes your mother tongue language (so, for example, if you are Italian you will sit on the Italian table and teach Italian). This semester it is held in Gotland Nation’s pub every Wednesday from 18:00 to 21:00 and you need to bring ID and your student card as they sell alcohol.

Be in Uppsala over the Valborg period! Valborg is the best student party in Sweden and its heart is here in Uppsala. Students from all over Sweden and beyond congregate in Uppsala having massive parties in public parks and squares and flooding the student nations which will all be open and jam-packed with events and people. The period is between the 27th of April and the 1st of May. A more specific guide on this important festivity will be published here (in English) closer to the time.

For an updated version of student life in Uppsala, check out the interview on the travel blog Average Lives.

Original article published in ‘Ergo’, Uppsala’s student magazine, on the 7th of March 2017.  Latest revision done today.

From Church to Research

The University of Uppsala is the oldest in the Scandinavian peninsula as it was founded in 1477, even before Columbus discovered America. Few people know the reason why Uppsala was chosen as the ideal location for the first academic centre in this northern part of the old continent. As many things back in the day, it was strongly connected to the presence of the Church and as it was pre-reformation, the church in Sweden was Roman Catholic.

When Christianity first arrived in Sweden back in the 800s it’s first centre was on the island of Birka, approximately 58 kilometres south of Uppsala, on lake Mälaren. It was a strategically important place as a lot of trade at the time passed through there. However, Sweden’s first Archbishopric (the place where the Archbishop, the most ‘important’ Catholic priest of the region, has his headquarters) was instituted in Gamla Uppsala in 1164. Why Gamla Uppsala out of all places? The reason is simple – just as the Catholics have done throughout history when trying to expand the fellowship of their religion, they tried to ‘localise’ it and adapt to the previous cult of the region. In this period  this was connected to the Vikings Norse religion which had its most sacred centre in Gamla Uppsala. This is also where the great men (stormän) of the time (“kings” per se didn’t exist at this time, they were other great men) resided – so both spheres of power, religious and rule of the land were located there.

If you have a chance Gamla, Uppsala is surely worth a visit. Located 5 kilometres north of Uppsala city centre, it is the Mecca of many Swedish school children who learn about the Vikings in the well presented museum and surrounding area. Outside the museum, one can see the mounds, artificial hills, in which previous great men were buried and also the spot where sacrifices to the gods were made; in fact, historians are still debating whether they also conducted human sacrifices on this site.

The choice of Uppsala as the site for the centre of the Catholic religion was obvious and the transition between the Viking culture and Christianity can be observed if one looks at the Viking runes situated in the garden in front of Universithuset (University house) which is located between the Gustavianum museum and Snerikes nation.

The importance of the connection between Church and university can also be observed by looking at the oldest university building in Uppsala, which is currently the site of ‘Gustavianum – Uppsala University Museum’, located in front of the cathedral’s main entrance. When the university was founded, it consisted of four faculties:

  •      Philosophy – taught in academic circles since ancient Greek times, it was the study of the world, a science before Galileo invented the ‘Scientific Method’ which then distinguished philosophy as we know it today from scientific studies.
  •      Law – to educate future lawyers, judges, bureaucrats and rulers of the land.
  •      Theology – to teach aspiring priests the knowledge and skill set they needed to become an active part of the Church.
  •      Medicine – which started being studied at the beginning of civilization but in late medieval times was studied more methodically in many universities.

These are the four categories mentioned in ‘O Gamla Klang’ an old student song that has it’s original version in  German (O Alte Burschenherrlicheit) a Swedish version of it was written by August Lindh, the founder of Uppsala’s ‘secret’ student society ‘Juvenalorden’, in the early 1900s. This song is normally sang at the end of all gasques/ formal dinners and students from the different categories  stand up and sing their part according to what they study and for the last few verses of the song everyone is standing on their chairs and toasting. Once the song is over people must not sit down again as if they do, it is said that they will not graduate. Everyone follows this rule with the exception of Västergöta Nation members who for some reason have a tradition of sitting down again and singing one more song.

When you tell your friends that you study in Uppsala University, mention some of the above facts. You are after all, part of a small group of students who study in an environment full of quirky traditions and student madness that strongly influences the rest of the city surrounding the university.

The Concept of ‘Student Nations’


Uppsala is world famous for its particularly awesome student life and what makes it so are ‘Student Nations’.

History:

The nations are student organisations that date back more then 400 years and originally when their function was for older student to support freshmen from their region to settle into life in the ‘university city’. They did this by providing help with accommodation, support and places to socialise (pubs and cafes). ln the past there were more then there are today and each organisation corresponded to a different region in Sweden.

Now 13 student nations still remain, some have merged together and although geographical regions are not that important anymore, you still choose to be member of one of them and someway you identify yourself with the organisation.

Historical photo
Stockholms’ Nation’s Main Hall

What does a nation have?

It depends on its size but generally they each have:

  • A Student Pub where you can find cheap drinks that are taxed less than in normal  laces (you can find beers for £3/€3.50, which in comparison to standard £5 is a bargain).
  • Norrland Nation's Pub
  • Student Club night once a week. Yes, that’s right, just for students so cheaper prices and unlike Saturday nights at ‘Tiger Tiger’ in Manchester, you will not encounter horny lasses celebrating their A-levels 40 years too late…
  • student club
  • Restaurant once a week. A la carte menu with really nice food where you can easily have a 3 course meal for £12 (and food in Sweden is generally more expensive).

Resturant

resturant 2

  • Student Cafe – study lounge:  where you can have hot drinks, milkshakes, sandwiches, salads and delicious pastries all of which is home-made.

cakes

 

  •  Formal dinners once a month (called gasques) where food is particularly  good, everyone dresses-up, there is entertainment during the meal (although most of it is in Swedish so I just nod and pretend to sing-along). Food + drinks + club/after-party  =  300kr (so approx. £30/€35).
Formal dinner
Västgöta Male quire performes as part of the entertainment provided during V.G.’s Gasque (formal dinner) in April 2013 .
  • Sport teams, societies, film-nights, culture nights and so on…
  • Student housing (cheap, good quality, bills included and you don’t have to deal with dick-headed agents who try to capitalise on your misfortune of having signed a contract with them).
  • Library and study area

 Stockholm's Nation's Library

How is all this even possible?

Thanks to the time dedicated by loads of student-volunteers that do not get paid and 4 one-year interns that work weekdays 9-6 in their offices and often even during weekends and get paid minimum wage. Everyone works for the benefit of other students in the ‘students for students’ spirit that should and wise administration of the funds and reinvestment of them in creating benefit for the students.

What do they get?

A great social experience. You meet so many people and interact with them in a different environment from the standard study or party one. Whether you are flipping burgers in the kitchen or pouring shots during the club you have an awesome time.

workers
Staff Dinner at ‘Östgöta Nation’. Once a month, after voluntarily spending a Sunday cleaning the entire venue, all who helped are invited to a 3 course meal with drinks and after-party included, all of which is paid by the nation.

You learn loads and no previous experience needed. From how to make cocktails, to baking pastries, recipes in the kitchen and if your colleague has good tunes on his iPod, you get to broaden your musical repertoire (before working in nations I thought Justin Bieber and Marco Carta were the best artists in the world #mindblowing).

I you have a position of responsibility you have staff discount on all food, drinks and formal dinners,  +1 club-night pass that allows you to skip the cue and get free-entry and earn ‘accommodation points’ that help you work-yourself up the waiting list to get student housing with the nation. You get a point for each semester you are member of the nation and if you take a position of responsibility you get, at least, one extra one per semester (I believe it varies on the level of responsibility and the number of hours you’re required to do every week).

Put stuff on your C.V. This works a treat especially if you hold a position of responsibility instead of being a casual worker.  This is a list of most of them (that I can think of):

–          Club master

–          Pub master

–          Official photographer

–          Magazine Editor

–          International Secretary

–          Bar Manager

–          Librarian

–          Kitchen master

–          Head waiter

–          Breakfast host

–          Lunch host

–          Café host

–          Weekend Brunch host

And I think there may be more..

Could you imagine something similar working in other parts of the world?

I tried to: Click here to read the idea I had to try and improve Manchester’s Student Union.

 

Useful Links (in English):

Student Nation Guide

Uppsala University

Facebook pages of some of the nations:

Stockholm’s

Västgöta’s

Varmland’s

The Good Society

Quote by Swedish politician Per Albin Hansson (1885 - 1946).

This is a quote by Swedish politician Per Albin Hansson (1885 – 1946).

His ideas are at the heart of the Swedish society that was ‘created’ during the course of the 20th century.

What do you think? Would you like your society to be more like the Swedish one? What would you sacrifice to work towards it?

 


This post was written by Alexander Maxia on the 13th of March 2013, two months into his exchange studies experience in Uppsala.