PopUp Cultral Café: Does Tech Make Society Alienating?

The first PopUp Cultural Café by Lost in a Cup will take place in Base10, right in the heart of Uppsala’s Tech Startup scene.

During the evening there will be a series of interesting talks, open debate and ample opportunity to mingle with people who share similar interests on the topic.

As the Cultural Café will Pop-Up in a StartUp hub, the topic is technology in modern society and the impact its having on our lives. Whilst the advantages of innovation are uncountable and in the StartUp world we often praise their glory, is there also a down side to this? Is our use of technology increasing the sense of alienation for us and the people around us?

The Speakers

Isabelle Edlund – Founder of ‘YouViaMe’

Claes Thorén – Senior Lecturer at Uppsala University

Jörn Passoth – Founder of

Places are limited so please click hereto reserve a spot.

If you booked a spot and can no longer make it, please send an email to: alex@lostinacup.com

The event is free of charge and will be held in English.

  • What: PopUp Cultural Café – stimulating talks, debates and mingle
  • Where: Base10 – Klostergatan 10 (1st floor), 753 21, Uppsala
  • When: Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 @ 17:15

Sounds interesting? Invite your friends to the event on Facebook!

#EspressøYourself #PopUpCulturalCafé

Ofvandahls – A Fika Institution

Uppsala is a very lovable city, especially for students. It’s a place where many historical events took place and if buildings could talk, most would tell fascinating stories dating back centuries. Cafés too played a key role in fuelling the academic work, a great example of this is Ofvandahls.

The café opened its doors in 1878 as ‘Erik Andersson Konditori og Damkafé’ and changed name to Ofvhandals in 1901. In many nation songbooks you find a song dedicated to it which mentions a series of things you could have ordered at the time (including ‘avec’ such as cognac, punsch etc.) which shows the long lasting love affair between the café and the student community.

A former Uppsala student, class 1968, told me that she and her friends often used to take lunch or fika there and then when the cathedral bells rang they would run up the hill to Universitetshusset to attend lesson. “Many cafes and restaurants come and go but Ofvandahls stays” said the lady who was visiting Uppsala for the day and chose to stop by at her cherished café.

Today the student atmosphere lives on and there still is a dedicated discount on coffee. Many still choose to meet there as opposed to going to more modern cafes in the center, prefering its coziness to free Wi-Fi. Homemade cakes, soups, sandwiches and the selection of teas offer something for everyone’s taste, especially on a cold winter day when something comforting is what you need.

Many things in Uppsala’s society are changing for better or for worse but the fika is a lasting institution in which people meet up, chat for hours and no matter how many cups you drink your bank account doesn’t suffer and drowsiness is not a problem; on the contrary, the more you drink the more you get pepped up, talkative and creative, as the caffeine rush goes through your veins.

This daily ritual lives on strong and so does the temple of traditional fika such as Ofvanhals, with its over 140 year history. It is a guarantee that no matter what happenes in the world, in that corner of Sysslomansgatan the hot drinks keep flowing; providing continuity in service that stands outside the boundaries of time.

  • Location: Sysslomansgatan 5, 753 11 Uppsala – Sweden
  • WiFi: No
  • Student Discount: Yes
  • Best for: ordinary Swedish coffee (filter) and traditional cakes!

The Future of Cafés

These guys in the 1930’s did not order a ‘caramel latte’; it was not on the menu at the time – but might they do that today?

The coffee world is ever changing and in recent years globalisation and big brands have brought the buzz of an expanded selection of coffees and drinks into the mainstream.

If the 80’s and 90’s were all about big chains of burgers and fast food; the first two decades of the new millennium have been all about coffee chains and capsule coffee – what else?

This has been a very exciting process which has seen many parts of the world discover espresso coffee and also American style long milk based coffees entered the high street with added syrups, flavours and whipped cream possibly.

You would not have found this in your local konditori 20 years ago!

This exciting innovation also has a down side, which is the struggle of independently owned cafes that due to difficulties in innovating or lower margins than the big chains often were forced to shut down.

So is it the end of independent cafes?

A typical “Bar” in Italy

I surely hope not! Family-run businesses offer charm and atmosphere that chains can’t! Even if they instruct their staff to write your name on the cup, smile and wish you a nice day it is still not authentic. It’s about history, community and passion.

In my coffee drinking mission I will explore many different kinds of cafes both old and new to see what they are all about!

What works? What doesn’t? What cool ideas are out there? By the end of this I might not be able to write a recipe of ‘how to make the perfect café’ but I hopefully will be able to give a few good pointers!

Follow this series of articles here on Lostinacup and on our social media pages /lostinacup. Don’t forget to share your thoughts in the comment section below or by using the hashtags: #TomorrowsCafe #EspressøYourself

60 Years of Cultural Institute – PopUp Café

Text: Alexander Maxia – Photos: Marcus Sätherström

Last November ‘Italienskkulturinstitutet‘ or the ‘Italian Cultural institute in Stockholm’ celebrated their 60th birthday. On this occasion ‘Lost in a Cup‘ was there with our Pop-up Café to contribute by bringing quality Italian coffee to the party.

PopUp Café at the Italian Cultural Institute in Stockholm

The participants to the event included many Italian expats who have made Sweden their home but also many locals that for one reason or another fell in love with Italian culture and took any opportunity to practice their Italian.

Over a hundred guests attended the celebrations

We designed the stand so that the coffee machines were facing the public and not the baristas. Our idea was to teach people to make Italian espresso themselves – for each other! After all, our hashtag is #EspressøYourself so what better way to promote the company ethos than by encouraging people to get a hands-on experience in espresso making and interact with others around them?

Luckily Ismaele Rombi, La Tazza d’Oro’s coffee expert, was on hand to supervise the many amateur baristas who were keen on learning how to make good coffee like in an ‘Italian Bar’. Italian espresso nowadays can be enjoyed across the world as long as the ingredients are of good quality and you have the right tools to make it. For the occasion we collaborated with the Italian household brand ‘DeLonghi’ who lent us their grinder and espresso machines that together with our own ‘Adesso Espresso’ capsule machine delivered fantastic espressos to the many enthusiasts.

Ismaele Rombi (left) sharing his knowledge on good espresso making

A few hours and 200 coffees later, the party ended. It was a great evening and the team at the Institute really did a phenomenal job in organising such a popular event. Driving back to Uppsala we reflected on the many interesting conversations we engaged in, the many stories of people who love ‘il Bel Paese’, the feedback and encouragement many gave us. We felt a sense of satisfaction. On a cold and dark winter evening we brought the taste and atmosphere of a ‘bar della piazza‘ to a location so very far from Italy, yet so strongly connected to it.

The team: Edwin Oldfield, Ismaele Rombi and Alexander Maxia

Thanks to the team at the Italian Cultural Institute, Ismaele Rombi and DeLonghi Nordics for making this PopUp Café such a success. See you next time?

Brown [Coffee] Friday

Last week was Black [Coffee] Friday so this week is brown coffee.

In Sweden many have a common belief that the darker the coffee is the stronger it is and also the better.

Obviously it is a fact of taste but true Italian espresso coffee is not black but is a light shade of brown, at least on the surface.

Why?

Because of the ‘crema’ which comes naturally when the water comes out of an espresso machine at a high pressure.

This ‘crema’ effect does not happen when you make coffee at home with a classic Italian ‘moka pot’ as it is a different coffee making system.

 

Did you know that technically moka made coffee is not called espresso coffee? Even though it is the most common household coffee available in Italy, it is referred to as ‘caffé’ – coffee.

Which do you prefer? Moka coffee or espresso?

 

Event: ‘Espresso Yourself’ – Uppsala

Ever wondered what’s the secret behind a great tasting Italian coffee? Love the barista made cappuccino but at home the froth never comes out right?

This is your chance to find out what makes a good Italian coffee and gain tips from a professional on how to become your own barista.

Join Lost in a Cup and La Tazza d’oro for an evening where all will be revealed about espresso coffees, latte art, Italian coffee tradition and much more.

You will get the chance to see Italian coffee expert and barista trainer Ismaele Rombi working his magic. He came especially from Italy to showcase great coffee so make the most of his tips! Feel free to ask him for advice and find out what it takes to make great tasting coffee, even at home or in the office.

 

There will also be the opportunity of tasting La Tazza d’oro coffee which is roasted in Cagliari, following 80 years of Italian espresso tradition. Discover one of the most renowned coffee brands in Sardinia that is now available on the Swedish market.

The event will be hosted in the beautiful Hamnpaviljongen Restaurant in the centre of Uppsala, just by the river.

Entry is Free of charge but you need to fill in the form and let us know how many will attend. If you no longer can make it, please let us know asap! The number of spots at the event is limited.

Click here to be re-directed to the RSVP form

More Info:

Facebook event

Hamnpaviljongen Restaurant website

Black [Coffee] Friday

Today is “Black Friday“!

Here at Lost in a Cup prices and philanthropist mission stay the same today as everyday of the year, so there will be no discounts on the products sold.

However we do strongly encourage people to celebrate today by having ‘black coffee’. 

We believe that a good cup of black coffee tastes more authentic and is more rewarding than any percentage of discount a retailer can give.

Many put milk or sugar, or both in coffee but it’s good to have a pure, black coffee to really appreciate its taste.

The simplicity of the flavour, appreciated even more if lukewarm, is something rather special. Often our lives are complicated with too many extra things but every so often if we just stripped it down to the basics, the essentials then we would really appreciate what we have.

It is a naked coffee, you appreciate every detail, both good and bad.

However if you do this, you might discover that the coffee you are drinking is not really great tasting in its ‘naked form’.

So then, why not try to fix that?!

 

Happy Black [Coffee] Friday!

 

Social Experiment: Pop-Up Café in Studentstaden

Pop-up shops, restaurants and venues have been popping up everywhere like mushrooms after the rain and appear to be the latest hipster trend.

So why not try out this concept with a Café?

That is exactly what we did today here at Lost in a Cup HQ in Studentstaden – Uppsala. The name of the neighbourhood in Swedish means literally ‘the city of students’  and it is the part of the city with the highest concentration of student rooms; Uppsala in general is also known as the most important university city in the country. You can’t get more student-centric than this!

 

The amazing part is that although so many students live in proximity of each other they rarely say hello to each other, let alone engage in conversations with neighbours.

So here came the idea: to attract people with good coffee and create a social space where strangers would actively be encouraged to engage with each other. Truly a social experiment. One of the attendees pointed out how this was ‘so not Swedish’ and chuckled and the fact it was something out of the ordinary attracted her to visit in the first place and would come back to future events.

 

Factors such as the size of the venue, limited to one 13 sq. meters plus a corridor and the authenticity of the Pop-Up Café being in an authentic student corridor made the setting ideal for spontaneous social interactions. Like a student house party but without alcohol and blaring music, just a chilled atmosphere and good conversations.

Only glitch in the project was the out-reach as the idea and development of the Café came around 24 hours before the actual event took place. Many Swedes plan their schedule with at least a week in advance so Italian spontaneity does not work as much as the organiser had hoped so the crowd was fairly small.

However, Sunday the 25th of November it will happen again! This time with more people and maintaining the good coffee and gingerbread biscuits which really went down a treat.

 

Will you join?

Check out the link to the Facebook event with all the details.

 

#PopUpStudentstaden

White [Milky] Friday

Today is ‘White Friday‘ on Lost in a Cup. Today we celebrate white, milky, some say ‘weak’ coffees such as the popular ‘Latte’ or to be correct ‘Latte macchiato‘ you can see depicted below.

Mixing milk with coffee in Italy is usually done in the mornings, for breakfast and there is the unwritten rule of ‘no cappuccinos after midday’. Often touristy destinations offer Cappuccinos on the menu of restaurants and pizzerias but be aware it is just for tourists! Most Italians would not have milk in their coffee after breakfast. The only exception is when they ask to stain their espresso with a splash of milk called a ‘macchiato’, which literally means ‘stained’. Macchiatos can be done with hot steamed milk, ‘a caldo‘ or with cold milk, ‘a freddo’.

 

Spoiler: next week will be “Black [Coffee] Friday”

Recipe: Espresso Martini

When you think of an espresso based cocktail the first thing that will spring to mind to most people is the all time classic ‘Espresso Martini’

A  very easy to make cocktail which tastes fantastic if you use the right ingredients.

 

Dick Bradsell, inventor of ‘Espresso Martini

It was invented in the late 1980’s by barman Dick Bradsell when a top model requested a cocktail that would: Wake me up and then f**k me up’.

 

The name comes from the main ingredient used for the drink together with the glass its served in even though it has no actual ‘Martini’ in it.

It soon became a popular drink across the world as its blend of enveloping taste and the simplicity in preparing it made it a perfect after dinner drink.

The bitter coffee flavor mixes with the coffee liquor to give birth to a drink to sip in all seasons. In the summer you can serve with ice scales, as a slush.

 

How to prepare it

The steps to prepare the Espresso Martini Coffee Cup La Tazza d’oro are few and simple.

We cool off a cocktail cup and pour 5 cl of vodka, 3 cl of espresso

coffee and 2 cl of coffee liqueur into a shaker.

 

Put the ice very dry and shake it very energetically for about a minute. Pour all the mixture, which will appear with a light foam consistent, in the cocktail cup previously flavoured with a touch of lime.

If you like, serve it on a slate dish with a tartar of fresh fruits and berries, lime and some coffee beans.

 

For an exquisite dessert version you can easily make a coffee affogato: put two cream ice cream balls in a bowl, add the Espresso Martini, plus another boiling coffee on the icecream  and… the refereshing dessert is served!

 

A more alcoholic variant is to replace Vodka with any kind of grappa, for a fuller and stronger drink.

As for any cocktail, the key is good ingredients so choose a nice vodka and a really good blend of coffee, such as ‘La Tazza d’Oro Miscela Bar’ to ensure an optimal result. 

 


Credits for this version of the recipe to ‘La Tazza d’Oro’.